howto://fix Outlook’s Autocomplete Cache

Problem

Outlook 2013 autocomplete stops working. Outlook works fine otherwise.

Cause

Probably nickname cache corruption.

Fix

You can use NK2Edit to fix a corrupt nickname cache file.

  1. Have Outlook open.
  2. Download and install NK2Edit from http://nirsoft.net/utils/outlook_nk2_edit.html
  3. When prompted run it. It will automatically open your nickname cache file and prompt you about the total entries versus good entries.
  4. Close Outlook.
  5. Save your nickname cache file (default save.)
  6. Reopen Outlook and confirm your autocomplete now works.

howto://automatically delete conversation history in Office 365

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One of the most useful parts of Lync is that it automatically saves conversations in a mailbox folder called “Conversation History.” I probably refer to content in there three or four times a day-what did my boss ask for? What what that URL Tim sent me? Who did I promise to send something to? Which customer wanted to do X? When you’re a hardcore multitasker and don’t have an eidetic memory, Conversation History can be a lifesaver. But if it is in your mailbox, then it becomes discoverable, and there are some companies (or rather, some legal departments in some companies) that think users will spill the beans in an IM, so they want to make conversation history go away. IF you don’t want to save Conversation History at all, for any user, with any client, then you can use Lync Online remote PowerShell to do that. This is not that blog post.

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Why’s my 50 GB mailbox only 25 GB?

2018-01-29 edit-the same principle applies today with the 100GB mailbox limits if your are still seeing 50GB on older mailboxes.

bigmailbox

Office 365 recently upgraded all enterprise customers mailboxes from 25 GB to 50 GB, but some users may find that they are still seeing only 25 GB of storage. If you find yourself in this situation, here’s a couple of quick fixes to set your users up for their new massive mailboxes.

Existing Users

If you have existing users whose mailboxes are still showing 25 GB limits, but you’ve been upgraded to the new 50 GB size, you just need to adjust those users. Here’s what you can do.

    1. Confirm that your mailbox databases have been upgraded. They should be by now, but best to make sure before you proceed. Open a remote PowerShell session to Office 365 and run this command
      get-mailboxplan | fl displayName, *quota
      If your quotas still show 25GB limits, open a support case.
    2. Run this command to increase the mailbox quotas for the 50 GB limits
      get-mailbox -resultsize unlimited | set-Mailbox -IssueWarningQuota 48.5GB -ProhibitSendQuota 49GB -ProhibitSendReceiveQuota 50GB
    3. Profit.

New Users

If you want to ensure that new users are automatically provisioned with the 50 GB limits, you want to update your mailbox plan defaults. You will have to do this for each mailbox plan in your tenant.

1. Remote PS to your tenant.

2. Get-MailboxPlan to get the plan(s) in your tenant.

3. Run this command, substituting your plan name. Command is one line that wraps.

set-mailboxplan ExchangeOnlineEnterprise-fdeba728-963d-40df-8ff3-9a6b7a751ab2 -IssueWarningQuota 48.5GB -ProhibitSendQuota 49GB -ProhibitSendReceiveQuota 50GB

4. Rinse and repeat if you have more than one, or you could do a “get-mailboxplan | set-mailboxplan…” to nail them all at once, as long as you don’t mind getting an error for any plans, like K, that cannot go that high. It won’t hurt anything to do it that way, but some folks hate to see red text.

And with that, you have some really big mailboxes for all your users. They won’t need to delete anything for years to come, unless of course they use their mailbox as a file system, and subscribe to every DL and newsfeed they’ve ever seen. Even then, if they want it all, they can have it all!

howto://USE a REGEX to match everything up to the @

regex2

I use PSPAD as my default text editor. It’s been my favourite such application for years because it can do so much. Recently I was handed a CSV that contained email addresses for 25,000 users. I needed to pull out just the SMTP suffixes for some manipulation. PSPAD can do global search and replace with a REGEX and it seemed like just what I needed. The only challenge was to figure out what pattern matches everything in an email address up to and including the @ sign. Here’s the pattern I used.

^([^@]+)@

That says to start at the beginning of the line, match any number of alphanumeric characters up to, and including the @. Easy.

2018-01-29 edit-since I am copying from Archive.org and am too lazy to try to recreate all the great comments, I am adding this one from my former boss, Jim Palic of ONLC, which is an even easier way to do this.

Another easy way to do that would be to use the negation operator inside the square brackets. e.g. ^([^@]+)@ Meaning match everything that is not an @.